Cattle and calves in Queensland suffer in ‘unbearable’ conditions

Cattle and calves in Queensland suffer in ‘unbearable’ conditions

Cattle producers in Queensland are suffering in conditions that have been likened to a “barking asylum” after suffering from an “unbearably high” number of infections in recent months.

Key points:More than 300 people have died and another 200 have been infected in Queensland’s cattle industry since August, according to data released by the Queensland GovernmentCattle producers are facing a shortage of feed and medicines to treat infectionsThe Queensland Government says it has received more than 300 complaints from people who have been in a “unable to maintain erection” condition for more than a monthIt is the third consecutive month that the Queensland government has recorded record-breaking numbers of deaths and infected people in the cattle industry, following a record-low number of cattle deaths in August.

At the same time, Queensland’s livestock industry is facing a huge shortage of the feed and drugs needed to treat an array of illnesses including meningitis, tuberculosis, pneumonia and meningococcal disease.

The latest figures show more than 30,000 cattle have died in Queensland over the past year, the majority in the south-east and north-west.

The Queensland Country and Region Health Authority (RCHA) said more than 600 people have been killed and nearly 200 more infected since the end of August, with more than 100 still in hospital.

The state’s agriculture minister, Michael McCormack, said the situation in the industry was “unacceptable” and that the Government was working to address the situation.

“These figures show that we are facing an unfathomable number of illnesses, with many people still in a state of un-barked erection, and we will continue to work to improve the state of health and safety for Queenslanders,” Mr McCormack said.

“The situation in Queensland is unacceptable, and the Government is taking all the necessary steps to address it.”

But the Government says the situation is now under control.

Queensland Premier Daniel Andrews said on Friday that the state’s Agriculture Minister had visited several farms, including one in the Gold Coast, to inspect the situation on a case-by-case basis.

He said that the government was working with the Queensland Rural Health Association and other health authorities to ensure the situation was managed and the situation could be addressed.

“As far as I know, the conditions are now under controlled,” Mr Andrews said.

Topics:cattle,industry,industries,health,health-policy,animal-health,environment,health_and-safety,animal,diseases-and-disorders,hospitals-and/or-pharmacy,qld,brisbane-4000,brisbanon-4350,brisbourn-4300More stories from Queensland

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